Take your time and plan wisely!

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  • #3905
    GeoffersH
    Participant

    I have been watching all of the videos on Youtube about TrainFever and have learned quite a lot by watching the videos made by Dads Gaming Addiction. He is one of the beta testers and to be honest, he is the only one who has actually given a run down of what all the controls are about and how to use them. He struggled at first in his first video, because there is no manual with the beta release, and it took a bit of fathoming out before he was able to  get things running right. A few more videos later, he seems to have fathomed everything out and instead of jumping right in and building train lines all over the place, he started off by concentrating on road traffic.

    Ok, 1850 and you are still plodding around with horse drawn vehicle, but none the less, these used on the dirt roads, will get your raw materials delivered to the manufacturing plants and onto the industrial parts of the town, with little expenditure. You can even set up a few stagecoach routes between towns, as well as internal town routes, all for little cost. Within ten years 1860 (about 2 hours game play) you will have made quite a bit of money with all your costs making profits and paying for there running costs. Once motor vehicles come available, change the horse drawn vehicles for lorries to transport goods and use the first bus to transport passenger between towns.

    Ok nothing exciting so far, but at least you won’t be in the red and your finances will be nice and handy for setting up your first railway, without you having to borrow money.

    What’s this guy rambling on about, I hear you say, we all know how these games work!

    Yes you do that’s correct but, to get the best out of these games, you need to plan at the beginning, don’t build too much at first and by the turn of the century (1900) you will) have enough capital to have a successful railway linking three or four towns.

    Just don’t borrow mega bucks at the start of the game or you will be forever in debt and will never be successful.

    Just watch the video’s from Video 4 onwards from Dads Gaming Addiction site and you will see what I mean. I don’t think he borrowed any money to build what he had set up. Using multi functional lines can save money instead of building separate lines as he shows in his video’s.

    That’s the approach I will be following once I get my copy of  TrainFever.

    • This topic was modified 6 years, 11 months ago by GeoffersH.
    • This topic was modified 6 years, 11 months ago by GeoffersH.
    #3909
    Mansen
    Participant

    There are many approaches to the game – Fewer but longer trainlines (Distance adds to the price of the deliveries) for slower but larger payouts. Or you can make a higher number of lines with a more stable but lower payday (Like coachwagons in every city in a region)

    The key thing is not to starve your industry and keep trains from short routes. A city will only accept as many goods as the industrial buildings in it can accept. Any more and the industry will turn down production (and acceptance of raw goods), turning your lines into a money hole.

    While the slow moving trains might seem like a great alternative to a wagontrain line early on, their speed will quickly reach a point where they can pick up goods faster than the industry can make new ones, resulting in trains that do nothing but cost you a lot of money in maintenance.

    #3911
    jm764
    Participant

    Idk, but when I play while recording for my TF Let’s Play… I totally ignore all these basic ideas! XD

    But when I play off recording I do just fine (same for any other game)

     

    Hopefully I can make my tutorial videos with out botching them up too bad, but if not I’ll be directing everyone to this page for advice! XD

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